Overview

Clean, renewable energy, like the privately-owned solar panels throughout Nashua, generate pollution-free electricity using a source that is in endless supply- the sun. Here we are looking at generation capacity – which is the maximum amount of electricity that could be produced by all of the solar panels in Nashua under perfect conditions.

kW

kilowatts

A kilowatt is a measure of power, or how fast something generates or uses energy. The higher a unit’s kW, the faster it uses energy. One kilowatt equals 1,000 watts.

Our Data
  • 10 kW

     

    2014

  • 1044 kW

     

    2015

  • 2135 kW

     

    2016

  • 2444 kW

     

    2017

Our Data
2014

10kW

 
2015

1044kW

 
2016

2135kW

 
2017

2444kW

 
  • Help us define our goal

    We do not yet have a goal for this area, but you can help shape our sustainable future.

  • Based on the data and comparison information, what do you think our goal for 2025 should be?
  • What are the top three actions you think should be taken by the City or the community at large to meet the goal you are suggesting for 2025?
  • Solar Panels

    In 2015, 7.3 gigawatts of solar power were installed in the US, which is more than enough for every home in New Hampshire and Vermont combined, with power to spare.

  • Did you know? 1 MW of solar energy can power 164 homes

How You Can Help

  • Reduce Electricity Use At Home

    One way to increase the amount of clean energy powering Nashua is to reduce the amount of electricity we need. Using EnergyStar Appliances at home is a great place to start. Take advantage of rebates here:

    More Information
  • Install Solar on Your Home

    Both State and Federal incentives are available to install solar on your home.

    More Information
Recent Updates for Nashua
Be a Part of Our Resilient Nashua Initiative!

Nashua will be working with community stakeholders throughout 2018 to develop a comprehensive resilience initiative with the main purpose being to identify acute shocks and chronic stressors impacting our City, now and in the future. We encourage everyone in our community to take part.

Full Article
Improved Water Quality in Lyle Reed Brook

For over a decade, Lyle Reed Brook, a tributary to the Nashua River had been listed as a water body with impaired water quality by the State of New Hampshire.  After being tested again in 2016, Lyle Reed Brook is now delisted and found to be fully supporting of aquatic life for both dissolved oxygen and pH.

Full Article