Overview

The energy we use to light, heat, and cool, our homes and businesses comes from different sources. Some of these sources, like oil and natural gas, pollute our environment and are in limited supply. Clean, renewable energy, like the City-owned hydro dams generate pollution-free electricity for Nashua that is readily available. Nashua now owns two hydro dams; Jackson Mills and Mine Falls (acquired in 2017).

MWh

Megawatt Hours

Hydropower generation is measured in megawatt hours (MWh). A megawatt hour is equal to 1,000 kilowatt hours (kWh), which is just above the average monthly amount of electricity consumption for a residence in the US-which is 900 kWh.

Our Data
  • 4,943 MWh

     

    2013

    Baseline
  • 3,915 MWh

     

    2014

  • 3,925 MWh

     

    2015

  • 7,577 MWh

     

    2017

Our Data
2013

Baseline

4,943MWh

 
2014

3,915MWh

 
2015

3,925MWh

 
2017

7,577MWh

 
  • The average US home uses approximately 10.8 MWh of electricity every year. Therefore, Nashua could power on average 365 houses per year from hydro power. One house for every day of the year!

  • The decrease in total electricity produced per year is due to the drought. With less water running through the plant, less energy is generated.

How You Can Help

  • Reduce Electricity Use At Home

    One way to increase the amount of clean energy powering Nashua is to reduce the amount of electricity we need. Using EnergyStar Appliances at home is a great place to start. Take advantage of rebates at

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  • Conserve Water At Home

    The drought has reduced the water available to create power. On average, a family of four uses 400 gallons of water every day. Limiting water use at home increases the water available for power. Calculate your water use here:

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Recent Updates for Nashua
Be a Part of Our Resilient Nashua Initiative!

Nashua will be working with community stakeholders throughout 2018 to develop a comprehensive resilience initiative with the main purpose being to identify acute shocks and chronic stressors impacting our City, now and in the future. We encourage everyone in our community to take part.

Full Article
Improved Water Quality in Lyle Reed Brook

For over a decade, Lyle Reed Brook, a tributary to the Nashua River had been listed as a water body with impaired water quality by the State of New Hampshire.  After being tested again in 2016, Lyle Reed Brook is now delisted and found to be fully supporting of aquatic life for both dissolved oxygen and pH.

Full Article